opinions - holocaust day
Holocaust Remembrance Day Makes Us Look Back and Learn from the Horror

by Halle Wilson

Holocaust Remembrance Day is a day to look back on a terrible time in history, and to remember what people went through during the Holocaust. During the Holocaust six million European Jews were killed by a German Nazi leader Adolf Hitler, and others.

Students are still being taught about this subject in history because it teaches us about ethnic cleansing, and stereotyping people in our society today. People should be accepted as they are in this world, and become comfortable with diversity. That is what our world is made up of, different ethnicities.

During WWII, a lot of people lost their jobs, were starving and living off the streets, because they had no money. There were concentration camps in Poland that Hitler sent the weakest, the most ill, the elderly, and even the youngest such as a toddlers into the camp to die.

The Jews, the gypsies, the handicapped, homosexual,children, Jehovah Witness, and the physically and mentally disabled were all affected by these death camps. [1] They were sent to concentration camps because Hitler only liked people that had blue eyes and blonde hair. If you didn’t meet those requirements you where sent to the concentration camps.

“I think it’s extremely important to remember the mistakes that were made in the past and the suffering of a large group of people. It’s important to remember them and make sure it doesn’t happen again and society needs to help everyone move forward,” commented Guidance Counselor Ryan Defibaugh.

“This tragic event affected our society heavily. It shows that there has been hate and there still is hate going on in today’s society and we need to make sure that we’re doing things to help each other and we’re not looking at the way it affects our background and how we all need to look out for each other,” commented Defibaugh.

The holocaust will never be forgotten — that’s why we as human beings remember the lives that were taken away. “The reason why we  remember the holocaust so,we will never forget the tragedy that took place,”said Social Studies Teacher, Jason Lepeonka. “The reason why it affected our society is because it showed how cruel human beings can be toward other human beings,” said Lepeonaka. That’s why social studies still has to talk about this subject, so our generation won’t repeat the past.

“The Holocaust marks an incredible point in history; just the overall treatment of people because of different cultures, religions, and race. It really defines the evil that can exist when we judge more political the treatment of Jewish people. The holocaust was one of the most horrific events in  history but it has taught us as human beings about bringing awareness moving forward,” said Principal Tracey Franklin.

“Our society has changed by bringing an awareness to the prejudice and dysfunctionality and being better than somebody else. This has empowered people to become a dictator or be removed against other people,” said.Franklin

“Post WWII brings an awareness to those who don’t have the same rights as the Jewish people.That time Germany did not have any rights and it brought equal rights,” said Franklin.

“How do we protect those that can’t protect themselves or don’t have the resources to protect themselves in our country? Advocating for minorities, making sure that we have things that we need, to live in a place where people are protected that could be discriminated against in our country. [The world] still has discrimination [but] we have laws and place to protect individuals in this world from people who treat people rudely just because you don’t like them what they believe in,what they look like,” said Franklin.

Remember those who lost family members in this tragic event. Hatred is something this country needs to work on instead of hating one another. Why don’t we come together and create a change to our society?

Source:

[1] http://www.kawvalley.k12.ks.us/schools/rjh/marneyg/04_holocaust-projects/04_amack_victims.htm

[2]  http://www.history.com/