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Sleep Deprivation Is a Serious Problem for Today’s Teenagers

by Jailen Reid Taylor

Do you feel like you get enough sleep? Students in Walkersville High feel they do not get enough sleep during the night.

Sophomore Sonih Scott commented “No because I’m still really tired and I usually don’t fall asleep until 11 p.m.¨

In most school districts, the move to high school is accompanied by an earlier school start time. Some high schools start as early as 7:00 a.m, meaning that some teenagers have to get up as early as 5:00 a.m. to get ready for and travel to school. [1] Teenagers require a lot of sleep juggling multiple things at once as school work, outside life, and maybe even a job.

Freshmen Lance Canaria commented “I don’t fall asleep until 12 because I’m up texting.”

Sleep deprivation will cause your teenager to be moody, irritable, and cranky. In addition, she/he will have a difficult time regulating her mood, such as by getting frustrated or upset more easily. [1] A teenagers mood can affect they way they may act toward other people or grades.

Senior Nafchahee Saimbre stated “No because I stay awake until 12 because I’m not really tired.”

Teenagers who are sleep deprived are also more likely to engage in risk-taking behaviors, such as drinking, driving fast, and engaging in other dangerous activities. [1] Teenagers may also not pay attention or even care about grades which could lead up to not getting into a collage of choice.

Sophomore Athaji Jackson said yawning “I fall asleep around 10:30pm. I still feel drained and on top of that i have six alarms to wake up.”

Studies show that teenagers who get less sleep are more apt to get poor grades in school, fall asleep in school, and have school tardiness/absences. [1]

Sophomore Darin Robey said “No, because I stay awake playing games and watching movies I’m more tired in the middle of the day than the night.”   

Teenagers are at the highest risk for falling asleep at the wheel. Drowsy driving is the most likely to occur in the middle of the night (2:00 a.m. to 4:00 a.m.), but also in mid-afternoon (3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m).

 

Source:
[1] http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/sleep-in-adolescents